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so as i'm doing this i'm going to go ahead and close out. i want to thank you for joining us today. it's been a real joy bringing you this program. so keep painting, stay inspired, and i hope to see you real soon on another yarnell school of fine art. >> hello and welcome to the "journal" here on dw. >> here's what's coming up in the next half-hour -- political deadlock in italy. what's next after an election that produces no clear winner? >> a trip down memory lane for the new u.s. secretary of state on a visit to germany. >> and a step closer to bundesliga. berlin get an important win. and that italy faces political deadlock after the country's national elections produced no clear winner. no single party was able to secure a majority in both houses of parliament. >> the center-left candidate is claiming a narrow victory, but it is not enough for him to build a government. >> former prime minister silvio berlusconi came in a close second. coalition talks are under way, but many italians are unsure they will produce a stable government. >> italian voters have elected new representa
. >>> fueled by a weaker yen and strong sales of cameras in the u.s. >>> and shares in virgin media rally after an offer for a takeover that could value the uk cable operator at $20 billion. >> all right. welcome to tuesday. >> it's get together tuesday. coordinated, as well. >> the final print for the eurozone is finally come in, 48.6, a little better than the forecast of 48.2. >> may i just say, though, the employment index, look at that, 46.1, which is just barely better than the flash estimate but still the lowest since december 2009. on a downward trajectory. it's not germany where the final composite was 54.4. it's the periphery still. france's final january pmi falls to 46.1. >> france is where the concern is. we have francois hollande today speaking to the eu parliament. he's going to lay out his vision for the eu against that economic back drop. >> isn't it amazing? we come into the week yesterday with everyone still talking. you have that great barons cover, you come in, just get the risk trade massively off. and the question for today and the rest of the week is frankly whether that'
memory lane for the new u.s. secretary of state on a visit to germany. >> and a step closer to bundesliga. berlin get an important win. and that italy faces political deadlock after the country's national elections produced no clear winner. no single party was able to secure a majority in both houses of parliament. >> the center-left candidate is claiming a narrow victory, but it is not enough for him to build a government. >> former prime minister silvio berlusconi came in a close second. coalition talks are under way, but many italians are unsure they will produce a stable government. >> italian voters have elected new representatives, but where does that leave the country? newspaper headlines are skating. one reads -- the only winner is ungovernability. there's already talk of free elections. >> i do not know what to say. i think we voters are being taken for a ride. >> i have no idea what will happen now. they will reach some kind of decision. everything is in the hands of four or five people again. they just do what they want. >> italy's political landscape is in turmoil. the central
big earnings reports coming in. we're awaiting on hp and aig. the bank that used to be essentially owned by, you, the taxpayers. we'll bring you the numbers as soon as they are released. markets shaken up by the minutes released from the federal reserve yesterday. coming up, we have dick evans, chairman and ceo of cullen frost bankers, member of the advisory banker of the fed, and his bank didn't take a dime of t.a.r.p. money and was able to survive and grow without t.a.r.p. funds. what he says is hurting our economy and what we need to spark more growth. sandra: crocs ceo joining us first on stock business, a pop today, following earnings, find out what the foot ware company is doing to follow up a record setting 20 # 12. david, the shoes still sell like hot cakes. daifd -- david: they came back because of good management. we'll talk about that, but, first, what drove the markets today with the data download. a sea of red on wall street with all three ending lower the second day in a row. s&p in negative territory for the week, on track to snap the longest winning streak in more t
trouble negotiating steps. he started using the cane several months ago. >> reporter: in his announcement, the pope said, quote,"i have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me." pope benedict xvi has overseen a series of scandals and controversy, including the sex abuse crisis in the catholic church. his critics charge he was not progressive enough, upset he condemned gay marriage, the ordination of women, and allowing priests to marry. but supporters viewed him as a steadfast leader, and praised him for warning against the subtle influence of secularism. >> wendy: joining us now with thoughts on these developments, is dr. cornelius becker a professor at regent university. thank you so much for being on the program. >> it greats to be with you. >> wendy: it is so unusual for a pope to step down, almost unprecedented, cepts fo -- exempt for that one time 600 years ago. >> it is unprecedented. weren't we've had several popes that have resigned for the position, but never for the reason this pope has offered, frail health and advanced age. i think it
. >> and is steady as she goes, the u.s. economy is expected to keep up the recent trend of modesty of unspectacular job growth in january. >>> plus, the dutch finance minister warns of a worsening deficit this year, this after the government is forced to bail out local banks after a bailout of 3.7 million euros. >>> we kick off with the pmis out of the eurozone. january manufacturing pmi, 47.9. the flash 47.5, december manufacturing pmi was 46.1. it has boosted the euro to maintain its gaze, now back over to 1.3651 and continuing to climb high. that is now a 32-month high against the yen, as well, at 11.25965. the german manufacturing pmi was a little better, as well, this morning. helping to boost those numbers. we suggest that there's benefits from emerging markets rather than, perhaps, from elsewhere in europe. anyway, coming in better once again for the eurozone. still in contraction territory, but, of course, the trend is what is being concentrated on. we had similar indicators for two die verging views on china's recovery. eases to 50.4 for january, that was below the forecast of 5079 the. bu
joins us again this morning. steve, we actually finally start the meetings today. we've had comments out from the russian finance minister, as well. what's he saying? >> well, he's trying to get us back on track on to a growth agenda, which when you look back at what the agenda was a couple of meetings ago back in toronto in 2010, that was sorely missing. that was about harboring deficits and having firm targets. it hasn't really worked, has it? what they've said is our growth estimates were slightly optimistic. listening to what some of the policymakers are saying this time around, the likes of mario draghi, i'm scratching my head a little bit. there's some uncontentious stuff. i can live with that. range of financial market indicators showing situation normalizing. but what about this bit? currency chatter is inappropriate, fruitless and self-defeating. hang on a second, mr. draghi. it wasn't us, the journalists that started this. it was policymakers. it was the g- 7. it's incestble we're going to start rumbling about this. i can't help but thinking mr. draghi is missing the point here
of the pond is the snowstorm. it seems like winds, 50 miles per hour. blizzard conditions in the u.s. we know when there's a storm like that headed for the biggest media market frankly in the world, it's probably all you're going to hear about for a while. >> that doesn't mean there aren't other things, too the. >> that's true, in other parts of the world. >> china is ushering in the year of the snake. i'm not sure what that means, but we'll talk about it. should investors brace for a slippery return? i have to say, previous years of the snakes haven't been that great since the big historical events happen. >> maybe we should call it year of the strong. >>> peugeot reveals massive write-downs as reports suggest the company may nationalize. we'll have details live tr paris at 10:10 cet. sxwt latest on the blizzard threatening to bring chaos to the east coast. we'll have the latest from atlanta. >> and are investments as pretty as a picture or a still life? ross, there's been a couple of big auctions here lately and it's always a good gauge of how well people are doing, how hard assets, real pr
is cleared for takeoff. reports say the boards at amr and us airways sign off on their $11 billion deal to create the world's biggest airline. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the world. >> all right. you're wearing an appropriate valentine's day shirt. >> i am. i tried. there's a little bit of pink if we look at your tie very closely. if you want to know what's happening in the markets today, hold on, ubs, the valentine's day gdp's massacre. >> yes. >> because if you look at when it's japan shrinking at an annualized rate, germany coming in on quarter on quarter, france coming in -- well, we know they had a recession earlier in the year, as well. minus 0.9% on the quarter been minus 2.7 on the year. >> oh, that's brutal. >> it's the sixth consecutive contraction and that match tess recession of 1992 to 1993. the minus 0.9, it was forecast at minus 0.6 is the slash gdp. >> and italy has been down 2.7% on the year, but this is something in the range of almost a 4% annualized drop until the year from a year earlier. >> the massacre
-off. u.s. markets fell yesterday following the release of the fed minutes. it was the worst day of the year for the s&p and nasdaq. as you can see, shedding 108 points there, a rare triple digit decline this year. energy and material stocks were the worst hit. all ten s&p sectors did hit the day lower. volatility on the rise. the vix rose nearly 20% on this session. the sell-off has continued overnight. the shanghai composite, the australian markets taking it on the chin. will i sixuan joins us from singapore. >> thank you, kelly. fears of an early access by the fed rocks sentiment here in asia today. the nikkei pulls back 1.4% from its 52-month high. investors remain cautious ahead of the decision on the next boj chief. construction equipmentmakers were down after caterpillar reported slowing sales for the quarter ending january. but batterymaker gsyuasa reported a fix over long-term battery problems. the shanghai composite tumbled to 3% today. commodity place were under a lot of pressure today after the u.s. fomc minutes raised the possibility of a qe asset. development and ce
of 87 of 75 against the euro, as well. darren maher joins us. there's been quite a big move already in sterling before this announcement, one wonders actually whether the ratings downgrade, now it's on a stable outlook, is perhaps the end of the weakness in sterling. >> i suspect not, to be honest. we can talk about it being a move and certainly over the last couple of years, there has been a big shift in cable. frankly, this has been a relatively small move. we can't say as of yet it's overshoot. i don't think the market will take great solace that we're now in a stable outlook from moody's because i think everybody recognizes the uk is still fragile and the growth position is more fragile, so i think more down side is possible. >> but what is in the price, darren? >> i think from this point forward is how much slippage do we get. i would say it's more what's in the price and what's in the price for sterling is the market has given the uk a lot of good will that it will be able to mix this wonderful growth of austerity. i think what the market is now doing is reappraising that. tha
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
. following the consequences of the drought last year, the president directed us to create a drought task force, made up of all federal agencies, to try to mitigate the impacts and effects of drought. that led us to begin thinking at usda about steps we can take to help producers during a difficult time. we took a series of steps to try to mitigate the consequences. we opened up crp land, and changed premium payments, things of that nation -- that nature. it also got us thinking -- were there other steps, other things we should be doing, to provide help and assistance? it occurred to us perhaps we should be focused more acutely on the need to encourage multi- cropping through the united states, in order for us to do a better job of conservation, to create biomass that could be a revenue source, and to potentially allow us to conserve precious water resources, which would in turn allow us to get through these drought circumstances in a more favorable circumstance. we have begun a process of looking at ways in which we could provide assistance. you will be fortunate to hear from a fellow by
shut for the chinese new year and large parts of the u.s. struggling with extreme weather. >> digging out from nemo, residents and u.s. businesses hope to resume to normal business after mother nature dumped nearly three feet of snow in some areas. >>> and ben affleck's iran hostage drama "argo" picks up the best film accolade. daniel day-lewis wins best actor. >>> we're up for another week. we might do what they did and share the love around. >> i read the reports. we're going to talk about it later. there was no one dominant film. >> i thought it was interesting that "argo" won best picture? it was a great movie, but best movie? really? is that the -- >> "lincoln" only got -- sometimes they're quite clued up. the nominations were very similar. do you think lincoln would do better than it did. >> daniel day-lewis picked up an award. help recap for those of us who didn't catch the whole thing or any of it, frankly, but yeah, britain's big film night. now it's time for the u.s. in a couple of weeks. >> besides that, plenty of other things we're looking at today. another day, another su
use only might accumulated leave time for this birth, and i made arrangements to have the child adopted at birth. pregnancy was immoral and administrative grounds for discharge, and that was that. so susan was sent back to the west coast where she was represented by the aclu of the state of washington. they managed to stay or discard -- to stay for discharge month by month. she lost in district court. she lost in the ninth circuit, but with an excellent defense. [laughter] the supreme court took her case, and they then -- and then the solicitor general been the dean of the first law school i attended, he saw a real damage potential for the government in susan's case. so he convened the military brass and he said, that rule about pregnancy being an automatic grounds for discharge, that's not right for our time. you should immediately wave the captain's discharge and then change the regulation. for the future. and that's what happened. now, the law students know what that meant for our case. the government had given susan everything she was asking for, so the government then immed
that is the biggest window. that is not over populated by u.s. capacity and capability. it is not religious. it is a it is not religious. we can extend it as needed. it should make us be more urgent. we find that when we bring urgency to almost any discussion inside of the u.s. government is a constructive thing to do. >> there are a number of areas in the u.s. government that look at failed and failing state. the undersecretary for political affairs has that responsibility. dns see used to chair and -- the nsc used to chair a committee. how does cso play into this? >> we try to work with everyone that you mentioned. we want to be aggregators of talent and good work that has gone on. for example, something as simple as analytics, we have a metadata analyst in our shop now, but we want him to be an aggregator of aggregators. i keep saying you have to be made silver on steroids -- nate silver on steroids. we cannot run enough staff to review and it turns out the intelligence community loves being called by the state department. they are flattered by it. they want their wo
. siemens. answers. >>> it is time for final trade time. pete, kick us off. >> bank of america ready to break out and get towards 13. >> mtw, construction trade, i ththe going to continue to move. >> steve weiss. >> qualcomm, running a sale, time to get it if you don't own it. >> that does it for us live goldman tech conference in san francisco. "power lunch" starts now. >> hello. welcome to "power lunch." michelle caruso-cabrera. in for sue and tyler. apple ceo tim cook making big headlines. the fight with hedge fund manager david einhorn and cannibalization of the company's product. more on that fallout. >> also mead china factor, las vegas rolling out red carpet for chinese new year tourist, which casino stock stands to win big. >> "sports illustrated" swimsuit edition hits news stands today. i bet you already knew that. supermodel kate upton on the cover for the second year running. she's going to join us live here on "power lunch." we don't want to miss that. >> in the meantime, let's check the markets. we have dow 14,000 and climbing as things stand at the moment, apple is wei
's will close its structured capital markets business and focus on investing in britain, u.s. and africa. they also posted earnings for 2012, down 6 million pounds versus 5 million last year due to a reduction in the value of the bank's debt along with situation payments for the selling of financial products. barclay's rate dividend to 6.5 shares for 2013 is off to a fairly roam start. joining us first is oliver ralph, financial times lex writer. oliver, thank you so much, indeed, for joining us. what do you make for what you've heard from anthony jenkins this morning? they're obviously trying to say it's going to take time, we're trying to restore our reputation. is it the right thing? >> yeah, it is the right thing. they've launched the business. the core of the bank remains the same. london investment bank and new york investment bank. the core of the bank remains the same. they're making changes around the area and the core of it is as it was. >> talk about the investment bank in particular. this has been the place where not just barclay's, but a lot of the competitors, too, try and
that the fed themselves have used the term. that has big im mrications for the lid quiddity of the market. on tech, it's certainly a story about one name over the last year, but you're beginning to see that broaden out. .i think that's a very good thing, but it's going to be a stock by stock story. i think that's exciting for investors. >> dean, what do you think about that, that whole idea with the race to the bottom with the central bank? is that something to worry about now or another year or two down the road? >> yeah. we spent a lot of time looking at volatility and currencies has been one place where even as the vix sags to 12, you've had this very, very healthy volatility specifically in the yen and then you have the central bank starting to talk about currency wars and korea has said something. of course, in europe, for all the talk of draghi's whatever it takes language, that riegz euro is not exactly great for them from a trade standpoint. you've seen the euro/yen collapse from a pricing standpoint. if you look at the vision and you look at the volatility in the markets right no
from her later in the show. >>> and taking the positive u.s. housing numbers from the nhab numbers. we'll be in new york with analysis at 11:45 cet. >> the italian election race is heating up. there is less than a week before voters head to the polls. comedian turns politician beppe grillo, in fact, is owes closing in on sylvia berlusconi for second place. official polls can no longer be published. the private polls seen by reuter s suggest mario monti may, in fact b with be something of a spoiler. >> and the election largely coming down to five key candidates. the front-runner is bersani. he's the leader of the center left pd party, calling for growth measures alongside monte's plan. sylvia berlusconi is threatening to make a political comeback despite corruption scandals. we've mentioned the comedian beppe grillo. at the same time, the former caretaker mario monti, he's been struggling to gain ground in his first ever political campaign. and then last, not necessarily least, there's the civil revolution leader and former public prosecutor antonio ingrola. >> only in italian politics.
line. >>> the u.s. filed a civil lawsuit against standard & poor's over alleged wrongdoing that fueled a financial crisis. >>> john kerry arrived for work at the state department. kerry was sworn in as secretary on friday. >> as the saying goes i have big heels to fill. >>> a massive fire at a lumberyard in west baltimore. firefighters were hurt when the blog collapsed. >>> dare devil alain robeir and the list of the tall buildings he's climbed. >> 99.99% of america are gun owners. would you leave us the hell alone. >> why aren't you a republican? >> how do you know i'm not? >> because obama appointed you. >> i've made jokes about you but -- >> and all that the mares. >> the public records indicate superdome officials were worried about a possible blackout months before the super bowl. >> on "cbs this morning." zbles that he how hard the city of new orleans parties, even their football stadiums blackout. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." we are learning new details about the end of an alabama hostage drama. fbi agents raided an
york times" on syria and whether the president may be reconsidering the use of american weapons supplied to the rebels. the concern president obama had lying weapons would in effect be involved in a proxy war supported by iran and russia. the other side of the debate is nothing else is working and we need to create pressure on assad and build relationship with people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels, al-qaeda affiliated rebels the united states and the west doesn't support. and i don't think it's in the west's interest to see them end up at the top of the heap. >> rose: and then we turn to the story of the chinese army spying on the american government and american companies with david sanger of the "new york times," dune lawrence and michael riley of bloomberg businessweek. >> the cyber has been off to the side as something of an annoyance. i'm hearing this has gotten so big it's moving to the center of the relationship and it risks the rest of the relationship. i think the next thing you're going to see the president sending some ki
. and that is why it is so important for us to do the report that we did. i will give you a perfect example. you have loan officers at banks being paid bonuses and pay based on how many loans they created. not whether those were good loans. not taking into account whether the loans would later default and caused sick of it and losses. there were a number of different causes of the financial crisis. we tried to bring a lot of transparency to it, to report on that. we are also doing a lot of work in this area to say what has not been dealt with. you are exactly right, fannie and freddie is not dealt with under dodd-frank. but let's talk about dodd-frank for a moment. there have been reforms to our financial system, but there needs to be significantly more. one thing about dodd-frank is it sets up a framework. but ultimately not all of the rules are implemented. there are very important standards that need to be set by the regulators and treasury. because what we are worried about is trying to protect americans in the event of another financial crisis. we do not want to be in a situation where one
their approach to the syrian conflict does something they could do to reassure the u.s. and the international community, it seems to be another clear implication of what you are saying is that the u.s. takes further steps to support the syrian opposition it would be read as strengthening their view that we are out to get them. >> we are out to get assaad. are we ipso facto out to get adirondacks -- to get iran? are we going to protect the allies, which is something i think we need to do despite the fact that they have a bad record? no one in syria has a sterling record, but it think we need to give them the opportunity to say there is a news syria forming. do they want to be engaged? what is the relationship there? i'm not very optimistic that we could get the iranians on board, but maybe you could find a way to make them increasingly less relevant. do they equate that with a regime change? maybe. we have to be aware of it. i think that's a stretch. i think the iranians could see, what i say is increasing value in the opportunity to talk if they begin to understand that the region is not movi
-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't ruled it out and down the road they may reconsider it. and really the emphasis
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
, denying the reports. and countering it was the victim of u.s. hacking. >>> and the bulls are back from a three-day weekend. can the s&p 500 post an eighth straight week of gains? we've got four days to find out. it's tuesday, february 19th, 2013. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin who is back from vacation. let's get started with the markets. as joe mentioned, the s&p winning streak has been a strong one. in the meantime, the dow is coming off a second straight weekly loss. although, really, if you looked at this last week, it was the ever so slightest of losses. u.s. equity futures are indicated higher. dow up by 21 points. s&p is up by two points above value fair and the nasdaq is up about 3. in 20 minutes, we'll turn to predictions on where the markets go from here. then in the next hour, delivering alpo. we'll talk to the manager of a $11.5 billion hedge fund. this fund was up 30% last year. don't miss pine river's ceo brian taylor. on our radar this morning,
you all for joining us here today and thank you all who joined us. [applause] >> in a few moments, secretary of state john kerry gives an address at the university of virginia. in an hour, a defense -- department of defense briefing on sequestration. after that, it review of the 2012 presidential campaign with strategists from president obama and mitt romney. secretary of state john kerry is calling on congress not to make senseless reductions in foreign aid to automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin march 1. the secretary spoke at the university of virginia in charlottesville. he was introduced by virginia senator tim kaine. this is an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you so much. hello, uva. it is great to be back on the grounds. i want to say to president sullivan what a treat it is to be here with you. thank you for hosting this great occasion. to my friend robert hurt, served with him in state government and now we travel to washington together. i look forward to good work together, especially if on this occasion to introduce secretary kerry and to introduce
minister here. this is an exciting time for us. we know of his leadership through the years and we are really delighted to have him here. we are excited that he can be with us today. i would especially like to say words of thanks for our colleagues. we are delighted to have you here, a senior advisor to the prime minister is here. the deputy chief and cabinet secretary. the ambassador is here, one of my bosses. i have to recognize him. a great service for america and japan, we are delighted to have you here. and the governor from alaska, he is our closest state to japan and has the keenest interest in japan. it is wonderful to have you here, governor. there is a new word in washington, the new economics that prime minister abe is bringing to japan. we have to get ourselves started again and i think that is exactly what he is doing in japan. i would like to take a second, talk about the foreign-policy agenda. japan's foreign policy going forward to protect freedom of thought, expression, and speech in the asia-pacific. can you think of anything more important than that? this will he
bill would be dead on arrival in congress leaving us with unsecured borders and a broken legal immigration system for years to come. stephen moore joins us now from washington, d.c. do you think that the white house plan really does throw a wrench into reaching any kind of bipartisan agreement? >> i think this was a real setback. this is very delicate negotiations. you need to find a way to let more immigrants into this country. you need to have a way where people who have been here to have a path to legalization. it has to be coupled with tougher border security. everyone knows that. for some reason, the president is basically saying, we will not move forward with the border security, but we will with these other elements. i think that is a killer. i think marco rubio is right. dagen: why leak it in the first place? in washington, there is always a reason that things come out. >> the groups on the left do not want border security. this was sort of an olive branch to the left wings that do not want border security. i think the president was trying to basically reach out and say
to say a word about the councils africa center for the benefit of the audience, those who are new to us were joining us for the first time via television or the internet. the africa center was established in september, 2009, with a mission to help transform u.s. and other healthy approaches to africa by emphasizing the building of strong geopolitical partnerships with african states and strengthening economic growth and prosperity on the continent. the center seeks to engage and inform with policymakers in the general public of the strategic importance of effort that. both globally and for american and european interest in particular. a subject which obviously -- a commitment you share by joining us today. of strategic importance. we do this for -- a robust media presence. we worked promote constructive us leadership and engagement in international affairs is done the central role of the atlantic community in meeting international challenges. the africa center supports and collaborates with product -- public and private sectors, giving practical solutions to the challenges in africa. on
. >> reporter: with earnings season winding down, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the wall street arena expects to hear anything terribly dramatic one way or another. >> reporter: since lawmakers and the white house kicked the proverbial can down the road around new years, the stock market has rallied rather nicely. the s&p 500 is up nearly 7% and the dow is about 150 points away from its all-time high. of course, stocks have been getting help from corporate america, too. it turns out fourth quarter profits were better than expected, led by the housing sector and financial firms. >> about 345 companies have reported so far, of which 70% have beaten earnings expectations and 66% have beate
meeting. they're due out later this afternoon in the u.s. will the fomc offer clues on an end to qe3? we're joined at 11:30 to weigh in. >>> with india's government clouded in corruption allegations, we'll speak to one of the country's wealthiest individuals and what it means for business. billionaire udai kotak joins us in 20 minutes' time. >>> plenty coming up including sony which is heading to the bill apple for a major on, national endowment. will the game console giant take the wraps off its rumored playstation? expert analysis at 11:20 cet. >>> and bhb bulletin has posted a steep fall in earnings for the first time in the year. the australian mining giant announced change at the top after the 43% drop in profit. we have more on this report from sydney. >> reporter: the surprise at bhp, billiton's ceo mariu marius kloppers announcement coming earlier than expected. >> coincided today with a weaker pricing environment. but two totally unrelated events. >> reporter: he will be replaced by andrew mckenzie, current head of bhp's middles division. he's well regarded in the industry and s
of the book. it is a dirty name. we love larry. he will join us in just a minute. took it off of there. one more shot. there you go. larry shover will be here in minute. sandra: let's go to nicole petallides at new york stock exchange. we have hewlett-packard, a huge winner in the, leading the dow. >> hewlett-packard really surprised everybody, sandra. ran away with the dow jones industrials. hewlett-packard soared on a great quarter and great outlook which surprised everybody. obviously a testment to the fairly new ceo, meg whitman. david:. also a testament to david donatelli, the executive vice president came out with the new server the size of a small book. even smaller than larry shover's book. getting bad news out of europe on the weight-loss drug. this company is behind the weight-loss drug. >> this particular drug was approved here back in july 2012. second time not approved in europe. concerns about side-effects. now they will have to do more cardiovascular trials to try to get this thing restored. sandra: network automation, this is, sorry, network automation company,
, cisco systems on tech spending. government orders not what they used to be for routers and switches, and european buyers watching euros and cents. john chambers is live on how to fulfill the promise to energize earnings. treasure in the trash. making money on what others throw away, especially on valentine's day. the dough in the hands of shareholder, company upping dividends again. waste management ceo joins us live in a fox business exclusive. "countdown to the closing bell" begins right now. ♪ good afternoon, everybody, i'm liz claman, the last hour of trading, and with the largest food acquisition on record to spike the markets, trading mixed in a narrow range. u.s. airways, we have turbulence there. it is down about 8% and change. this, as the rumor becomes the news. u.s. airways merging with asr, parent of american airlines, the deal that creates the world's largest character. sketchers off to the races, shares are skyrocketing here, a nice move of 12%, the maker of mens and women's footware with whether or not blowout numbers, and we got the shoes, yeah, thanks to strong de
will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but the two sides of that agreed. two seasons have been played without it. last weekend in new orleans, roger goodell was asked a number of questions including one on the issue of head injuries. here is more from last week. [video clip] >> i welcome the president's comments. we want to make sure people understand what we are doing to make our game safer, not just in the nfl but throughout sports. the changes we are making a in the nfl are changing all of sports. it is a better recognition of head injuries. of treat
host who has been back with us, jeremy siegel, the bull. steve liesman, also thank you for sitting in all week. that's been terrific. becky and joe, it's been great. good luck over the weekend. we hope you get back here and it all works out. say hello to nemo and the weather. we're going to see you -- >> be careful with all that snow. >> absolutely. anyway, make sure you join us monday. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good friday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee. we're live from the new york stock exchange. let's see how your friday session is setting up on the u.s. futures. it looks like we'll have a positive session with the s&p looking at 2 at the open, dow looking at 13. in europe, the eu summit continues. but the action really taking its cues from china this morning. we have green arrows across the board in europe. take a look at asia. strong eco data out of china in focus. much more on that in just a moment. the road map begins at the golden arches. not even the cheddar onion burgers could help mcdonald's. they missed estimates in every
that. but in any event, it's the group using the one and half million cell phones but it's the group watching the south korean soap operas but it's the group that is becoming the information consumers of north korea who are desperate for more information or salivating, the chairman of google was visiting because they are thinking that the opportunities for their closed system internet. and then there's all the north koreans a sickly, the rest of north korea, most of north korea, where just puncturing the bubble of censure, of censorship that exist in north korea with what north korea really spends on defense, what it spends on its missile programs. i've always equated it to the lesson of development including the local aid budget upon the village schoolhouse door so villagers would know if the village elders were stealing the money. that was intended for the schoolhouse. i think we can through basic information in this age that more and more north koreans know about the human rights record. north korean database that's now a permanent growing database now, five, six years running bec
>> let's talk about recent comments in canada, the u.s. ambassador to canada and find that more action by canada on climate change might make it easier for the president to approve keystone. how did you interpret those comments? >> i think it was another opportunity to talk about what we are doing. i believe for the president and for canada, it is both. you can actually improve energy security and in our neighborhood of north america and with vehicle emissions standards, coal plants standards, you will eventually see that in the united states. nobody is replacing a coal plant with coal again. they are replacing it with natural gas. it reduces emissions by 50%. i did not see that as a quid pro quo. when the secretary of state and our minister of foreign affairs met and had a press conference, they talked about both climate change and energy security. we talked about vehicle emissions standards. th minister talked about the action we've taken had the the united states on coal plants in canada. i closed down some coal plants. i thought it was good for our jurisdiction but i think e
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